How secure is your home?

Crime including theft and attempted theft at the home unfortunately is on the increase, with a rise of 7.8% of theft incidences from January 2016 to January 2017. Maximum security at your home could rapidly reduce the risk of theft and malicious damage, so it would be in your best interests to at least know what security you do have. Your insurers also consider theft as a key risk factor when assessing your home, but what does this mean and when does it apply to you?

When insurers ask what level of security does your home have, they mean, what window and door locks are at your property and do you have any additional security like an alarm.  Window locks that comply with minimum security for most insurers are, key-operated window locks to all accessible windows.  These would normally be UPVC windows for example and if you have a ground floor flat the windows would still be considered accessible. 

Door locks, would be referring to all final exit doors, for example if you have a porch on the front or side of your house, the door to the porch would be considered as one of the first final exit doors.  The door beyond the porch to enter your home would not be considered a final exit door.  This is because the theft risk is higher if your porch is not secure, regardless of whether your door to your main home is more secure.  If your porch can be easily broken into, it will then disguise the attempts of a break in to the front door of your home, giving thieves more time to enter your property without drawing attention.

If you live in a flat, whether purpose built or a flat conversion to an existing dwelling, final exit doors would only refer to doors to your specific flat/apartment not any exits to the main building. 

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